Month: October 2017

Installing Metal Roofing Options

Choosing the maximum roof can be a technical choice. When confronted with the possibility of setting up a new roofing system, it can be tough to understand if the decisions you’re making are the right ones. It may even be confusing to understand exactly what result each of these choices is going to have in the future!

 

Today, we’re going to help you comprehend metal roof installation better. When moving forward with metal roof, we will assist answer concerns such as:

 

– Which fastening technique is finest?

– Why does it matter?

– What are the benefits?

 

These may seem like relatively basic concerns, but it is the cause of some argument in the roofing contracting world.

 

Some alternatives are as follows:

 

1. Exposed Fastener System (believe screws that you can see when looking at your roofing);.

 

2. Hidden Fastener System aka Standing Seam Roof (think screws that exist but hidden by the panel);.

 

3. Concealed Adhesive Fastening System (think adhesive and no screws or holes).

 

What You Need To Know About Exposed Screw Fastener Metal Roofing Systems.

 

Exposed Fastener typically describes a visible screw fastener that is being utilized to permeate through the roof product. However, this traditional method of roofing attachment has actually proven to be troublesome since the exposed screws used throughout setup have the tendency to be over tightened up, rust, or back out in time.

 

How does a screw “back out?” When your metal roof is exposed to severe temperatures and weather, the metal will broaden and contract. In time, this thermal motion of the metal panels puts recurring pressure on the countless screws in your roofing causing the screw holes to increase the size of. When this occurs, screws can loosen and revoke the wood deck. When the screw ends up being loose or revokes the roofing altogether, you now have an opening on your metal roof which can trigger a leakage.

 

In general, Exposed Fastener roofing has actually shown itself to be a threat for leaks. The useful danger presented by this vulnerability is not completely avoidable and has actually been enough to hinder lots of house owners from moving on with this kind of through-fastened panel.

As a general guideline, exposed fastener roof is more cost effective than standing seam roof. You can install a stunning looking roofing system for less money by choosing an exposed fastener system, but you may be compromising in the arena of longevity.

 

What You Need To Know About Concealed Screw Fastener metal roofing Systems.

 

Hidden Fastener Systems, usually standing seam systems, provide metal panels with raised interlocking joints. Screws are utilized to attach the side fastener fins into the roofing system deck. While this type of system conceals the screws that are utilized for installation, standing seam roofings are prone to fastener tension which can trigger unpleasant oil can dimpling of the metal panels. Standing seam systems also make use of fastener slots or attachment clips developed to enable thermal motion of the panels, however incorrect fastener placement limitations this function.

 

Setting up a standing seam roofing is labor-intensive and can be costly. This can be a deterrent for many homeowners.

 

What You Need To Know About Concealed Adhesive Roofing Systems.

 

Hidden Adhesive roofing systems are a new development to the metal roofing market. While standing joint was when known as the “brand-new and enhanced” roofing choice in the 1980’s, more research has actually been performed to enhance systems that have weaknesses.

As a property owner, does it make sense to buy a roofing option that requires thousands of screws that trigger holes or dimpling in your metal roofing system? Basically you are paying for somebody to poke holes in the very thing that is protecting you from outdoors components.

The market bore in mind of this problem and began trying to find the next “brand-new and enhanced” strategy to offer a service for homeowners who desire the look of metal, without compromising the integrity of the very product they are purchasing.

 

The Bottom Line.

 

When seeking to re-roof or even construct a new home, picking a metal roof will offer you the durability, performance, and charm you are trying to find. Now that you know about all 3 metal roofing attachment approaches, you can make a smart and educated choice about the metal roof you are purchasing.

 

If you ‘d like more information on metal roofing and how it can be a terrific solution for your home or organization, visit www.expexts.com.

Roofing Shingle Service Warranties – What You Need to Know

The Basic Warranty

Wind also causes shingles to warp, which not only allows more moisture and particles, but can also cause shingles to break or snap.

Wind Service warranty

High winds can be extremely harmful to shingles. Effective gusts will rip the shingles from your roofing, but even weaker winds can trigger pricey damage.

Shingles will lift, even if just for a second, in strong adequate winds. This can be the start of 2 problems. First, when the shingle lifts, particles and moisture can blow in under the shingle. As soon as the shingle go back to its initial position, it traps the debris and wetness. If there is excessive moisture, it could leak through your roofing system and harm your home. The caught particles also keeps the tile from lying completely flat, which lets in more wetness and debris.

No matter which roof shingles you select, they should abide by government standards and have a minimum warranty that the shingle will perform as assured. Guarantees usually range from 15 to 40 years, but there are an increasing variety of shingles readily available with a lifetime service warranty.

It is essential to note that many shingle manufacturers have specific installation instructions and inappropriate installation of your roof shingles can void your service warranty.

While roofing shingle warranties are typically thought about requirement, there can be substantial differences in guarantee protections in between similar shingles. Perhaps most importantly, some warranties just cover the expense of the shingles, but not the labour had to get rid of the old roofing system and set up the new one.

Algae Resistant Service Warranty

Algae development is a common roofing problem that causes dark streaks on your roofing shingles. The algae can be cleaned away, however it will likely return, particularly if you live in a humid climate. If you have actually had algae problems in the past, you need to search for algae-resistant coverage on your shingle service warranty.

Visit www.aceroofco.com for more shingle service warranty information

The Advantages of Using Drone Technology in the Roofing Industry

Given that the FAA updated its policies controlling non-recreational use of tiny, unmanned airplane systems (UAS), or drones, in August 2016, it has actually become less complicated for roofing contractors to capitalize on this promising modern technology while still staying within the laws.

These brand-new laws lead to excellent information for the roof covering sector. Here are six ways drone modern technology can possibly benefit your roof organization:

Cost savings:

Take into consideration just how much money you might conserve in automobile as well as gas costs if you no more needed to roll a large pickup truck with ladders for every single assessment. Additionally, measuring the job might take less time, allowing your study employees to go to even more sites in a day.

Determining:

Conserve money and time– as well as enhance safety– by utilizing a drone to take dimensions of the roof prior to developing your estimate. Drones also supply industrial contractors the capacity to do a survey of the website, which may prove beneficial when establishing points of entry as well as leave to the jobsite, in addition to determining the most effective positioning for product as well as car parking.

Checking:

Take video and also imagery of the whole roofing system to reveal the proprietor the problem the roof covering is in. This can consist of a drone-based thermal imaging examination to look for leakages and dampness, which FLIR supplies to GAF factory-certified professionals. Drones might be especially beneficial for inspections of very steep roof coverings where there could be additional risk of getting up on the roofing. When the drone assessment takes place, you can utilize this details to examine with the property owner or structure owner any troubles and explain exactly how you can repair them.

Separating:

Drones could assist you look extra professional in the eyes of the home owner or structure owner. Set your firm aside from a rival and also excite your potential consumer with a remarkable, interesting video.

Recruiting:

Lowering the have to often climb onto high roofings might turn you into a much more appealing firm to benefit, and aid attract and retain a more diverse team of beneficial workers.

Advertising:

Before-and-after videos are effective marketing devices. Place them up on your internet site, show them to possible clients, and show the difference you can make through your top-quality product and also installment. There’s a reason drone technology has actually come to be common in property advertising and marketing: it adds sizzle for prospective customers!

Initially, it is critical for you to know the legislations and license requirements that accompany utilizing drones. Protect yourself and your company by making sure you have the information you need.

Visit this website for more information on drone usage in the roofing industry – www.expexts.com

Please note that the materials and information included in this post are for educational purposes just and not for the objective of providing lawful advice, not a replacement for obtaining lawful guidance from a qualified attorney and also ought to not be acted on as such. You must not act upon any of the information included at this blog post without first looking for qualified expert advice for your details requirements and also you ought to contact your attorney to acquire recommendations relative to any type of particular concern or problem. The details presented in this article might not be current as well as undergoes alter without notice.

Copper Is the Solution for Challenging Residential Roof Restoration

Copper Is the Solution for Challenging Residential Roof Restoration

This home in Alexandria, Va., was retrofitted with a copper double-lock standing seam roof system

This home in Alexandria, Va., was retrofitted with a copper double-lock standing seam roof system installed by Wagner Roofing. The 16-ounce copper roof panels were 17 inches wide. Photos: Landmarks Photography—Jay Stearns

“We like the tough jobs,” says Dean Jagusch, president and owner of Wagner Roofing Company. “We like the intricate jobs.”

Headquartered in Hyattsville, Md., Wagner Roofing has served the Washington area market for more than a century. “We specialize in historic restoration and innovative architectural roofing and sheet metal,” Jagusch notes. “We’re full service. We do slate, copper, tile, and have a low-slope commercial division as well. But our trophy stuff tends to be of the steep-slope variety.”

A recent residential restoration project in Alexandria, Va., certainly qualifies as “trophy stuff,” taking home a North American Copper in Architecture Award from the Copper Development Association (CDA) in the “Restoration: Roof and Wall” category.

It’s easy to see why. The origami-inspired design features multiple roof angles, but the daring design was problematic. Even though the home was relatively new, the owners were plagued by leaks. Along with Restoration Engineering Inc. of Fairfax, Va., Wagner Roofing was called in to consult on the project, determine the source of the leaks, and come up with a solution.

The original galvalume standing seam roof channeled the water into a large, stainless steel internal gutter with roof drains. Jagusch found that the leaks were occurring at two types of critical points. First, there were leaks where the internal roof drains met the central gutter. The other problem spots were along the pitch transitions.

Jagusch felt that installing a conventional-style painted galvalume roofing system in those spots was almost impossible. “We felt that was since it was an area that was failing, we wanted a metal we could work with when we met a transition and turn the panels vertical where we needed to without having to break them and rely on rivets and caulk,” he says.

Custom five-sided downspouts were fabricated

Custom five-sided downspouts were fabricated, but large windows at the back of the home offered few options for support. The downspouts were attached up under the framing system. Photos: Landmarks Photography—Jay Stearns

Copper was the answer. “The detailing was pretty tough to do, so we recommended changing it to copper so we could work with it, be able to solder and have a more seamless roofing assembly,” Jagusch recalls.

Another key to the project was redesigning how the roof drained. “We decided to push all the water to the exterior,” he says. “We collaborated with Restoration Engineering and we fleshed out the original redesign.”

The team decided that installing a copper roof system with a new drainage plan would be the best way to eliminate the leaks and keep the inspiring look the homeowners desired.

“We wanted to eliminate the drains and push all the water to the exterior, so that’s why we went for the re-slope of the big central gutter,” Jagusch says. “Also, at the transitions, we wanted to make sure we were 100 percent watertight, so we used a combination of turning up panels and soldered cleats to get everything into place.”

Solving the Puzzle

With its intersecting planes, the roof made laying out the panels an intricate puzzle. “You also had large expanses of roofing that changed pitch throughout,” Jagusch explains. “Panels had to be laid correctly because not only does the roof slope up, but it also slopes sideways. The layout of the panels was critical from the get-go. We all looked at it and agreed that we would follow parallel to the actual trusses, which we felt was the best solution.”

The old roof system was removed and stripped down to the 3/4–inch plywood deck. “We covered the entire roof deck with Grace Ultra,” said Jagusch. “We then used a slip sheet and installed 1-inch-high, double lock, 17-inch-wide, 16-ounce copper standing seam panels.”

Photos: Landmarks Photography—Jay Stearns

Photos: Landmarks Photography—Jay Stearns

Panels were roll formed at the Wagner metal shop out of 20-inch-wide coils using an ESE roll former and trailered to the jobsite. Approximately 5,400 square feet of copper panels were installed on the project. The double-lock seams were mechanically seamed. Twenty-ounce copper flat-seamed panels were used in the large valleys.

The safety plan included full scaffolding during every phase of the project. “We have our own safety scaffolding system,” Jagusch says. “Our guys demand it on our jobs, and we demand it of them to come home safely every day. We are very proud of our safety record. It’s front of mind for us.”

In addition to the roof, all of the metal cladding was replaced on the southeast feature wall. The top of the wall was reconfigured to accommodate the new sloped valley. Where the wall met the roof, a band was fabricated to match the top part of the fascia. Other details included copper cladding for the chimney.

Drainage was redirected to the perimeter, where custom-fabricated gutters were installed. “On the west side, the roof was originally designed to dump off straight onto a rock feature on the ground, but we fashioned a custom copper box gutter about 35 or 40 feet long,” Jagusch states.

At the either end of the large internal gutter and at the end of a large valley, shop-fabricated copper conductor heads were installed. Custom five-sided downspouts were fabricated, but installing them posed another challenge, as large window areas offered few options for support. The downspouts had to be snugged up under the framing system.

“Everything had to work with the other building components,” Jagusch explains. “One of the tougher things on this project was being able to have the function and the form both top of mind, in that order. The key was to make the functional stuff look good.”

Showpiece Project

The project was completed about a year ago, and the copper has begun to change in color. “The copper now has a gorgeous bronze, kind of purplish hue to it,” notes Jagusch. “I think it will eventually develop a green patina, but with the way the environment is these days, I think it will take 15 years or so before it gets to that point. That’s the cool thing about copper—it’s a natural, breathing material that is constantly changing, constantly evolving.”

Copper cladding was installed on a feature wall

Copper cladding was installed on a feature wall, which also featured changes in slope. The top of the wall was reconfigured and a band was added to match the top part of the fascia. Photos: Landmarks Photography—Jay Stearns

Wagner Roofing has a maintenance agreement in place on the home, so Jagusch has stayed in touch with the owners and kept tabs on the project, which is performing well. “I’ve got just one hell of a team here,” he says. “It wasn’t just one estimator that went out and brought this thing in. In our business, estimating and roofing is a team sport. We kicked this thing around a lot with all divisions of the company, from estimating to operations to the actual installers before we finally settled on a number for this thing.”

“We work on some pretty spectacular places, and of course this is one of them,” he concludes. “We like a challenge, and this is the stuff that my team really loves to get their teeth into.”

Published at Wed, 04 Oct 2017 07:00:46 +0000

K-NRG Seal™ VP

K-NRG Seal™ VP

KARNAK, an industry-leading manufacturer of reflective coatings, sealants and cements, recently announced the launch of K-NRG Seal VP, a high-performance vapor-permeable air barrier for above-grade wall application.   

K-NRG Seal VP expands KARNAK offerings, which include roofing, damp-proofing and waterproofing products; fabrics and repair tapes; caulks, sealant and flooring products; and elastomeric products.  

Published at Wed, 04 Oct 2017 13:00:00 +0000

MRCA to Release SHARP New Employee Orientation Video at 2017 Trade Show

MRCA to Release SHARP New Employee Orientation Video at 2017 Trade Show

There will be a show-only special price for this new SHARP video for anyone attending the free trade show October 17 and 18.

MRCA is releasing a new edition of the SHARP new employee orientation video. The video is a helpful tool for training new members of your crew.

See a preview of the video.

Contractors receive a free trade show pass. Register online today.

Published at Wed, 04 Oct 2017 14:51:13 +0000

North Carolina Middle School Generates More Energy Than It Uses

North Carolina Middle School Generates More Energy Than It Uses

Sandy Grove Middle School in Hoke County, N.C.

Sandy Grove Middle School in Hoke County, N.C., was designed to be an energy-positive building. It generates 40 percent more energy than it consumes. Photo: Mathew Carbone Photography

When Robbie Ferris first presented the idea of a school building that generates more energy than it uses, people were skeptical. Now he can point to Sandy Grove Middle School in Hoke County, N.C., as proof that a high-performance school building can go well beyond net zero and generate 40 percent more energy than it consumes.

Ferris is the president of SfL+a Architects and manager at Firstfloor, a development company that specializes in public-private partnerships and design-build-operate agreements. “We designed the building, we own it and we lease it to the school district,” he says. “We monitor all of the systems remotely. One of the reasons we do that is because when you put really high-performance systems in buildings, you have to make sure they are operating at peak efficiency. It can take time to make sure everything is optimized.”

Three years after completion, Sandy Grove Middle School is outperforming its energy models, and the building continues to win accolades. It recently received Energy Star 100 Certification and has been recognized as the nation’s most energy positive school.

“Sandy Grove Middle School is a perfect example of a high-performance facility,” says Ferris. “With the public-private lease-back model, everyone wins. The students receive a quality school, it fits in to the school system budget, and it is energy efficient to help both total cost and our environment.”

The building’s systems were designed to be as energy-efficient as possible, and that includes the roof, which features an array of photovoltaic (PV) panels to generate electricity. “We wanted a roof that would last 30 years,” Ferris notes. “We’ve had a tremendous amount of success with TPOs, and metal roofs as well. This particular client wanted a metal roof look from the front, but they were very open to a membrane roof on other parts of the building. We made the decision to put the metal roof on the front of the building and a TPO on the wings at the back of the building.”

On this project, the warranties were important considerations, along with durability and energy efficiency. SfL+a specified a standing seam metal roof system manufactured by Dimensional Metals Inc. and a TPO system manufactured by GenFlex. “Obviously, if you’re putting a couple of million dollars’ worth of solar panels on your roof, you want to make sure you have a roof that is going to be problem free.”

A Smooth Installation

The installation was a challenging one, but everything went smoothly, notes Aaron Thomas, president and CEO of Metcon Inc. Headquartered in Pembroke, N.C., Metcon is a full-service general contractor that specializes in energy positive commercial buildings, so it was perfectly suited to serve as the construction manager on the project.

Photovoltaic panels were installed

Photovoltaic panels were installed on both the standing seam metal roof and the TPO system. The systems on the low-slope roof sections are fully ballasted, and both sections were installed without penetrating the roof system. Photo: SfL+a Architects

Thomas and Ryan Parker, senior project manager with Metcon, coordinated the work of subcontractors on the job, including the Youngsville, N.C. branch of Eastern Corp., which installed the TPO and metal roofs, and PowerSecure, the solar installer on the project, based in Wake Forest, N.C.

The roof systems covered 85,000 square feet, and Sharp PV panels were installed on both the metal roof and the TPO system. Solar panels were also installed on freestanding structures called “solar trees.” Each solar tree is 20 feet tall, 25 feet wide and weighs 3,200 pounds.

“The TPO roof system was upgraded to an 80-mil product due to solar panels being added to the roof,” Parker notes. “It was 100 percent ballasted on the low-slope sections, with slip sheets being used below the racking on the TPO roof.”

On the metal roof, clips manufactured by S-5! were used to affix the solar racking to the seams. “There are no penetrations for the frames, and penetrations for the electrical wiring went through vertical walls, not the roof,” Parker says. “There were no penetrations anywhere in the roof system, which made all of the warranties that much easier to keep intact.”

The biggest challenges on the project, according to Parker, were coordinating the different scopes of work and ensuring all of the manufacturers’ warranty considerations were met. “We had two different kinds of roofs, both coupled with solar panels,” Parker says. “Like any rooftop with photovoltaic products, there had to be special attention paid to the warranties of all parties involved. Both Genflex and DMI were closely involved in coordinating details to ensure that the owner achieved a great roof free of defects.”

The building’s systems were designed for energy efficiency

The building’s systems were designed for energy efficiency, and the roof features an array of photovoltaic panels to generate electricity. Photo: Mathew Carbone Photography

One key was developing a detailed schedule and keeping everyone on it. “We would meet once a week and huddle up on how it was progressing and what else needed to be done,” Parker recalls. “We found that by using a collaborative submittal sharing platform, all of the varying parts and pieces could be checked by all parties to ensure compatibility.”

There were multiple safety concerns associated with combining solar panels to the roofing system, so everyone had to be on the same page. “The roofing subcontractor and the solar subcontractor performed a joint safety plan that utilized common tie off points,” Parker notes. “The job had zero lost time.”

“Everyone coordinated their work and it was a great team effort,” Ferris says. “It was one of the smoothest jobs I’ve ever seen. We have not had a single leak on that project—not a single problem.”

Proof Positive

For Ferris, the greatest obstacle on energy-positive projects convincing members of the public and governmental agencies of the benefits. “The biggest challenges had nothing to do with construction; they had to do with just doing something new and different,” he says. “The toughest challenge was getting the school board, the county commissioners, the public and the review agencies on board. It took a very long time—and lots of meetings.”

Photo: SfL+a Architects

Now Ferris can point to Sandy Grove as an example of just how a high-performance school building can pay huge dividends. “As soon as you see it in real life, you’re on board,” he says. “It’s very exciting for people to see it. If we can get people to the school, they’ll walk away convinced it is the right thing to do.”

With Sandy Grove, the school district has a 30-year lease with an option to purchase. Ferris believes the lease model is the perfect solution for educators. “We’re responsible for any problems for the life of the lease,” he says. “If a problem does come up, we usually know about it before the school does because we monitor the systems remotely online.”

“In their world, buildings are a distraction from educating kids,” Ferris concludes. “This is one building that is not a distraction.”

TEAM

Building Owner: Firstfloor, Inc., Winston-Salem, N.C., Firstfloor.biz
Architect: SfL+a Architects, Raleigh, N.C., Sfla.biz
Construction Manager: Metcon Inc., Pembroke, N.C., Metconus.com
Roofing Contractor: Eastern Corp., Youngsville, N.C.
Photovoltaic Panel Installer: PowerSecure, Wake Forest, N.C., Powersecure.com
Metal Roof System Manufacturer: Dimensional Metals Inc., DMImetals.com
TPO Roof System Manufacturer: GenFlex Roofing Systems, GenFlex.com

Published at Wed, 04 Oct 2017 12:30:24 +0000

Southern Charm: Graham Roofing

Southern Charm: Graham Roofing

Bobby Hooks started a roofing company with two friends as a means to make money while still in college. Nearly five decades later he’s built a business legacy that rivals any competitor in his market, and fostered an extended family of loyal employees still getting it done on a daily basis — continuing to make Graham Roofing Inc. (GRI) one of strongest commercial and industrial roofing firms in the Deep South.

While it may not have been the original plan he had in mind when he entered Mississippi State University in 1968, roofing turned out to be the best avenue for Hooks to put his long-standing work ethic and years studying at MSU’s College of Business and Industry to the test. After college, the trio continued to work on the business and officially incorporated in 1971, a few years before the EPDM explosion and other product advancements revolutionized commercial roofing across the country.

Published at Wed, 04 Oct 2017 04:00:00 +0000

New Construction Project Tests Contractor’s Mettle

New Construction Project Tests Contractor’s Mettle

Photos: Lynn Cromer Photography, Ferris, Texas

Photos: Lynn Cromer Photography, Ferris, Texas

Independence High School in Frisco, Texas, was conceived as an impressive new construction project on a tight schedule. The standing seam metal roof of the building was a key component in the architectural planning, as it was designed to provide aesthetic appeal for the massive structure while minimizing the view of mechanical equipment for passers-by on the ground.

The roof also was comprised of several low-slope sections, which were covered with a modified bitumen system. Both the metal and modified systems contributed to the building’s energy efficiency, helping the project achieve LEED Silver status.

The roof systems were installed by the Duncanville, Texas, branch of Progressive Roofing Services. Randy Dickhaut, the company’s general manager, indicated the project was completed in approximately one year—an ambitious schedule for a job of this size. “It was a challenging new construction job,” he says. “There were a lot of logistics involved, but in general, the job went very well.

A Tale of Two Roofs

The first goal of the project was drying in the metal decking. A two-ply, hot–mopped modified bitumen system manufactured by Johns Manville was installed on 24 decks totaling approximately 195,000 square feet of low-slope roof area. The system was applied over two layers of 2 1/2-inch polyiso insulation and 1/2-inch JM Securock cover board. The system was topped with an Energy-Star rated cap sheet, DynaGlas FR CR.

Photos: Lynn Cromer Photography, Ferris, Texas

Photos: Lynn Cromer Photography, Ferris, Texas

In the nine sections where the 88,000 square feet of metal roofing was installed, two layers of 2 1/2-inch polyiso insulation were attached, along with plywood decking and self-adhering TAMKO TW Tile and Metal underlayment. The standing seam metal roof system was manufactured by McElroy Metal, and the company provided the manpower and equipment to roll form the panels on the job site. Roof panels were the company’s 22-gauge Maxima 216 panels in Weathered Galvalume. These panels were complemented by 24-gauge Flush panels on walls and soffits.

The roll former was mounted on a scissor-lift truck. The eaves of the building were approximately 36 feet off of the ground, so a sacrificial panel was used to create a bridging effect to help guide panels to the roof. “Basically, the roll former went right along with us,” Dickhaut recalls. “We would pull 30 or 40 squares of panels, then drop the machine and move to the next spot. We were able to roll the panels right off the machine and lay them in almost the exact spot they would be installed.”

Photos: Lynn Cromer Photography, Ferris, Texas

The length of some of the panels posed a challenge, and as many as 12 crew members were needed to guide them into place for installation. In the steep-slope sections, crew members had to be tied off 100 percent of the time, so retractable lanyards were used to help keep safety lines out of the way.

The roof was mechanically seamed using a self-propelled industrial roof seamer manufactured by D.I. Roof Seamers. “We call it walking the dog,” notes Dickhaut. “One man can operate the equipment, and he just walks it every inch of every seam.”

The metal roof was designed to hide the mechanical equipment for the building, and Progressive Roofing completed work on two deep mechanical wells before the HVAC equipment was installed. “In the wells, we used McElroy’s Flush panels for the vertical surfaces and transitioned to the metal roofing,” notes Dickhaut. “In the bottom of the mechanical wells, we installed the Johns Manville modified roof and flashed the curbs.”

Rising to the Challenge

Dickhaut points to a few challenges on the job, including the length of the panels and the weather. “Overall, the job went really well,” he says. “The architects did a great job on the design, and McElroy has really good details. It was a pretty straightforward process. There was a lot of wind and rain we had to cope with. When you have a 100-foot panel that you can’t kink or scratch, it can get kind of tricky. You just have to be very careful.”

Photos: Lynn Cromer Photography, Ferris, Texas

Photos: Lynn Cromer Photography, Ferris, Texas

The Texas weather made the schedule unpredictable. “We were on that job over a year, so we caught all four seasons,” he says. “Weather had a huge impact. We dealt with extreme heat, humidity, snow, ice, mud, monsoon-type rains. Texas throws anything and everything at you.”

Whatever the conditions, Progressive Roofing was ready. “We show up locked and loaded,” Dickhaut says. “We attack it. We have seasoned veteran roofers that lead the pack. On that particular project, we had an architect, roofing consultants, an owner’s rep, and a general contractor. We would also bring in the McElroy and JM reps periodically for consultation. It’s really a team effort.”

TEAM

Architect: Corgan Associates Inc., Dallas
General Contractor: Lee Lewis Construction Inc., Dallas
Roofing Contractor: Progressive Roofing Services Inc., Duncanville, Texas

Published at Tue, 03 Oct 2017 21:00:10 +0000

Apex Tool Group Names Jeff Campbell VP of Sales and Channel Marketing North American Hand Tools

Apex Tool Group Names Jeff Campbell VP of Sales and Channel Marketing North American Hand Tools

SPARKS, Md. — Jeff Campbell recently joined Apex Tool Group (ATG) as vice president of sales and channel marketing, North American Hand Tools. He’s responsible for sales and channel marketing efforts in ATG’s Industrial, Construction, and Automotive distribution channels which include all North American Hand Tools product lines, such as GEARWRENCH®, Crescent®, Lufkin®, and Wiss®.

Campbell reports to John Constantine, SVP and president, North American Hand Tools. “We are very pleased to welcome Jeff to the ATG team,” said Constantine. “He brings a wealth of experience to this key role. We look forward to Jeff’s continued success in building brands and helping our customers win.”

Most recently with Werner Co., Campbell served as senior vice president of North American Sales for its Werner ladders and fall protection, Knaack jobsite, and Weather Guard truck and van products.  Before Werner, he worked for Newell Brands as vice president of sales for its IRWIN and LENOX tool brands, among others, and was responsible for all U.S. sales in its professional distribution channels.  Campbell holds a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Lambuth University.

For more information, visit www.apextoolgroup.com.

Published at Tue, 03 Oct 2017 12:00:00 +0000